Quidditch Post CEOs Say Goodbye

ySIKj4vdnZ1IrUatiPVhgreIsgNNsGqxqGJyOtjSJD25icZpNKAyzg7KSbB7shstfo4ou2tDGPmQKSoG82iYKv6wTcsuwgcw9WK75gZcZRZrW3BLbORNa_uGHpr2Ib3QYXV109UA.png

By Andy Marmer and Lindsay Garten

World Cup has come and gone, and we couldn’t be more proud of the work the Quidditch Post has done. We previewed all 21 teams, in depth, wrote fascinating features and analysis articles, and, of course, live-tweeted nearly every game along with videos – not to mention the post-tournament coverage we still have to do.

The two of us have been leading the Quidditch Post since its inception, and have been involved in media long before, on our college campuses, as part of the IQA, and as part of USQ. Andy first wrote about quidditch in 2009, and we have both been heavily involved with various quidditch organizations since 2013. Now, it’s 2016, we’re both 25, we’ve both graduated with advance degrees: Lindsay with her masters from Columbia University, and Andy with his J.D. from New York University. Lindsay has started a career in environmental consulting and Andy will start work with a law firm in September. We are at the point in our lives where we can no longer dedicate the time that QP requires of us.

Andy and Lindsay doing adult things outside of quidditch.

When we first started QP, we wanted to leave behind a website that would last as long as the sport. It’s our hope that when our hypothetical children discover quidditch many years from now, they’ll stumble upon the Quidditch Post and we can tell them about the early days. We want to leave a legacy, but part of that is knowing when to step aside and hand over your baby to someone else. Now is that time.

Quidditch Post started with just the four of us. Now we have more than 70 volunteers on five continents. Some of the most talented and passionate people that you’ll ever meet work for QP, but we need a new leader. As CEOs, we dedicate a lot of time to QP, probably in excess of 60 hours per week total. It’s a full-time unpaid job, but the rewards of working with people, advancing the sport, and seeing the final results make it all worth it. Meanwhile, we will continue to run the Quidditch Post until we find a successor.